STEPS: Changing the way you write literary analysis

The WKU Writing Center would like to announce an up-and-coming resource for students to utilize when writing literary analysis papers.

STEPS (Students Teaching English Paper Strategies) is a web site designed to help students write good papers about literature. This site is constructed for students, by students, and provides a doable process for analyzing literature and writing about it. STEPS helps students identify literary devices, determine the themes of literary texts, develop thesis statements, and produce successful essays. The site is filled with sample essays, peer reviews, and processing notes for each step. Students will also find a helpful glossary of literary terms, with examples from various works, and links to additional writing resources. Please visit www.writingaboutliterature.com for more information.
For students taking English classes (both in or out of the major), STEPS provides relevant information for the various stages of the writing process. Sometimes, as a writer, you just get stuck and there’s no real conceivable way to get out of the writing funk. However, just searching through some of the tabs on the site, I’ve found them to be very helpful at finding ways to propel the process along. Sometimes just reading about writing can get you ready to start writing. It’s funny how that works sometimes…
There are two tabs that I found particularly helpful, as well. The “Process and Methods” and the “Resources” (the “Archives” section especially) tabs are both excellent tools to utilize. The latter section, the Archives, even has example papers and the writing process therein. Every person has their own writing (and editing) style(s), and it can be beneficial to see what works for someone else, and then try to apply similar techniques.
The STEPS homepage.
So, whether you’re stuck finding a starting point, or if you’re just looking to improve your writing, we definitely encourage you to check out STEPS. The site is still in its beta-form, too, so be sure to leave any feedback you think might be helpful.
Happy Writing!
This post was originally published on November 10, 2014.
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